All children receive development screening that includes:
    A. the timely screening of all children within three months of program entry;
    Family Handbook (Section 14 & 15)

    14.  Children’s Ongoing Developmental Assessment and Evaluation Process

    The Fishback Center teaching teams assess children’s development and learning on an ongoing basis as part of the children’s experiences while attending the Fishback Center for ECE.  Families are always welcome to be part of the assessment process. The assessment process consists of daily observations and documentation of overall development, of the children’s individualized goals, and of their experiences within a small group, developmental screenings, developmental checklists, and Brookings School District standard kindergarten indicator assessments.  The curriculum goals and objective connect and follow the children’s progress.

     

    Children are informally assessed during their typical daily schedule.  Taking a child to a small, quiet room will only occur when assessing children using developmental screenings, using standardized developmental checklists, or using standardized curriculum indicator assessments in Kindergarten.

     

    Timeline:

    Type of assessment

    When does it occur

    Denver II Developmental Screen

    This screen occurs within the first 90 days that a child is enrolled in the preschool program or when the child turns three.

    Individual & Small Group Developmental Baseline Data – based on individual children’s goals & class goals

    During the first three weeks of the school year and then for the preschool – during the first three weeks of the second semester.

    Daily observations of Individual, Small Group & Class Goals

    Occurs on a Daily Basis

    Developmental Ages & Stages Screen/Checklists

    When needed – discussed with family members

    Kindergarten Standard Indicators

    Quarterly

     

    Developmental Screening: Developmental Denver II Screenings determine a child’s growth regarding developmental milestones.  It is used to determine if a child may benefit from more in-depth developmental assessments.  Mentor teachers will discuss screening outcomes & possible potential benefits with family members including the purpose, the scoring, and the training process for teacher candidates, and interpretation of the screening for their child.  Family members may have access to screening information or copies of the developmental screening instrument at any time.

     

    If a child may have developmental delay, the mentor teacher will set up a 1:1, confidential meeting with family members to discuss the possibility of an additional developmental screen, such as the Ages and Stages screen or a selected checklist or work sampling may be used as a second tool in determining the benefit for early intervention.  The meeting will also include the documentation and explanation of the concern from the first screen, suggested next steps, and information about further community resources in the early intervention B-3 services system or the school district system if the child is older than 3 years.  We encourage to families whose children may benefit from early intervention to seek services and advocate for their children.  As a teaching team, we will advocate for families who are seeking services, too.

     

    Individual & Small Group Baseline Data:  This data’s purpose is to determine children’s interests and their initial quality of development with the aim of refining and planning for developmental opportunities at school.  Areas of children’s development and learning include:  cognitive development, language development, social-emotional development, approaches to learning (such as learning dispositions and life-long learning skills), health, and physical development (including self-help skills). 

     

    Daily Observations & Documentation of Goals – Individual, Small Group, and Class:  Individual, Small Group, and Class goals are based on conversations with family members, conversations in teaching teams, the SD Early Learning Guidelines, and the SD DOE Kindergarten Standards.

     

    The individual goals and baseline data are shared informally with families when development-prior to Parent-Teacher conference time.  Family members, please raise concerns, help make decisions for next steps, and add ideas to be incorporated into classroom practices.  Children’s individual goal information will be kept in their record files and only used in the curriculum planning log, and individual portfolio development.

     

    The Daily Observations’ purpose is to capture and describe daily developmental progress and learning of children.  It is to capture their insights, thinking, and developmental achievements in order to make them visible to the teaching team and family members.  Observations and documentation are also used to improve curriculum, to adapt teaching strategies, to adapt environments, and finally to make overall program improvements.

     

    Kindergarten Standard Indicators:The SDSU Kindergarten follows the South Dakota DOE curriculum standards for kindergarten.  The Standard Indicators assessment’s purpose is to assess children’s learning and progress regarding selected standards.

     

    15. Communication with Families about Assessment Process

    All information gathered is available to families at all times and will be communicated to families through daily conversations, conversations to establish individualized goals, in 1:1 meetings, in Parent-Teacher conferences (offered two times a year), and in the children’s individual portfolios (which are completed two times a year).

    Fishback Center Handbook of Policies & Procedures (Excerpt from pg. 60)

    Assessment Plan

    The SDSU Preschool uses assessment in many different forms (both formal and informal) to take note of children’s growth as a group & individually. Staff at the SDSU Preschool use both on-going, daily assessment methods (outlined below), and formal screening assessment tools.

     

    Denver II Developmental Screen:At the beginning of the enrollment process, children are given a Denver II Developmental screen to determine current developmental growth at time of entry. These are given in the fall of the initial enrollment year. If the child’s developmental growth is typical, the results will go into the child’s file. If the child’s developmental growth has a “red flag(s)”, then the results will be discussed initially with the ECE assessment instructor and the director to determine its validity and reliability. Next, if determined reliable and valid, the results will be shared with family members in a conference to determine the next steps, whether that may be a re-screen with a ECE faculty member who knows the child, or to refer to the Early Childhood/Child Find process for further developmental assessment and diagnostic evaluations.

     

    Collecting On-going Data – Lesson Planning, Individual Children’s Development & Growth:Children are assessed daily through the use of the informal methods of data collection.  

     

    Anecdotal Records:Anecdotal records are observations taken by teaching team members regarding events or behaviors the teaching team has noted as events to be observed. These notes are snap shots of interactions, behaviors, or events that can serve as evidence for determining children’s interests & needs, planning, and individual portfolios.

     

    Field Notes:  Field notes differ from anecdotal records in that they are ongoing, day to day notes on the same topic or long term investigation. They attempt to capture children’s thinking about the topic that is occurring and examine potential misconceptions that they may have, in order to revisit the notes with the children and pose conversations, activities, or experiences that directly challenge the misconception. Another use of field notes is to revisit with the children conversations they have had in order to clarify their thinking processes (i.e. “Remember yesterday when you said, ‘the block is blue because it’s falling?’  Tell me more about that. Or- What did you mean by that? Could you tell me more?). These notes are used to inform the planning process, are used to document children’s thinking in terms of the long term investigation, and are used to note children’s thinking within individual portfolios.

     

    Daily Journals:Daily Journals highlight the day’s events for the class through pictures and narrative. Quotations of children’s conversations that highlight learning or thinking about the topic may be added. A copy of each day’s journal entry should be put outside the door for families to read. A second copy should be put into the classroom’s Daily Journal Log. A third copy may be placed in the Action Research Binder if the contents of the Daily Journal relates to the Action Research question being studied. Journal entries should be considered when planning for potential future activities, when noting individual development and/or group understanding of an event.

     

    Other Daily Assessments indirectly assessing the children:

    Planning Logs:The Planning Log is a 3-ring binder used to keep together teaching teams’ lesson plans and ongoing notes regarding curriculum development. It should contain teaching teams’ webbing notes (as a team and with parents), copies of weekly lesson plans, weekly ongoing adjustment forms, and suggestions from parent observation log when related to planning.

     

    Parent Observation Logs:The Parent Observation Log is a 3-ring binder located in the observation booth for parents’ to record observations and contributes ongoing planning suggestions. These notes are used when planning.

    This indicator specifies that the screening by conducted within 3 months of entry into the program.  During an assessment assessors will specifically be looking for evidence that children are screened within 3 months of enrollment.  From a best practices perspective, screening should be conducted on a yearly basis.  Programs may also refer to the instructions for the specific screening instrument that they use as evidence of the specific time frame in which the screening should be conducted.
    B. Screening instruments that meet professional standards for standardization, reliability, and validity;
    Denver II Developmental Screen

    The Denver II has been found to be valid and reliable.  See EarlyOn statement:  "Test was normed on a sample of children who were full term and had no obvious developmental disabilities. The sample was diverse in terms of age, place of residence, ethnicity/cultural background and maternal education. The norms indicate when 25%, 50%, 75%, and 90% of children passed each item. The test has good inter-rater and test-retest reliability (correlations .90 or higher for most tests). Test has been found to have somewhat low sensitivity in predicting later developmental status and school readiness [2]."

    http://www.earlychildhoodmichigan.or...rTools7-03.htm

    Ages and Stages Questionnaire The Ages and Stages Questionnaire has been found to be valid and reliable.  See EarlyOn Statement:  "Overall agreement on children's developmental classifications was 83% between the ASQ and professionally administered developmental scales, with a range of 76% to 91% agreement. Test-retest reliability was over 90% at a 2 to 3-week interval, and agreement of parents with trained examiners also exceeded 90% [1]. "   http://www.earlychildhoodmichigan.or...rTools7-03.htm
    Rate as 'Yes' if the program portfolio includes at least a brief summary or statement as to the validity and reliability of one or more of the instrument(s) used.  Examples of Screening tools include:  Mullen Scales of Early Learning; Brigance; DIAL 3; DENVER II; Ages and Stages; ESP: Early Screening Profiles; ESI-R (Early Screening Inventory).
    C. Screening instruments that have normative scores available on a population relevant for the child being screened;
    Denver II Developmental Screen

    The screening tool has been normed on a sample of children.  See EarlyOn Statement:  "It is a standardized measure that has been normed on a diverse sample. It can be quickly administered by trained professional and paraprofessional staff."  

    http://www.earlychildhoodmichigan.or...rTools7-03.htm

    Ages and Stages Questionnaire The screening tool has been normed on a sample of children.  See statement: "The normative sample, recruited through newspaper advertisements and by contacting child care centers, comprised children who met the following criteria: (a) no previous history of developmental or serious health problems as reported by parents; (b) full-term (>37 weeks) at birth; (c) never assigned to a neonatal intensive care unit. Those who met criteria and gave informed consent were selected. Because of the overlap among risk factors, the two risk categories—medical and environmental—were combined into one "risk" category. Detailed analyses specifically related to risk status and completion of ASQ are described elsewhere (Squires et al., 1995); however, the mean domain score of children from the combined risk groups was lower on 94% of ASQ items (n = 224) than mean domain scores of the normative sample. In addition, percentage agreement between questionnaires completed by parents from the risk group and a standardized assessment ranged from 80-91% (M =
    85) whereas percentage agreement for questionnaires completed by parents in the normative sample ranged from 84-93% (M = 89).  The total number of children in the sample was 2,008. (Not all children and parents are included in all studies of the questionnaires. Most validity and reliability studies included only a subsample of children and parents.) Of these, 53% (n = 1,068) were male; 47% (n = 940) were female. Eighty-one percent (n
    = 1,620) were risk status; 19% (n = 388) were nonrisk status."  Source:  Squire, Bricker, & Potter (1997). Revision of a parent-completed developmental
    screening tool: Ages and Stages Questionnaires1, Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 22(3), 313-328.
    Rate as 'Yes' if the screening instrument or supporting documentation includes references to normal or expected scores for all children by age or stage.
    D. Screening of children's health status and their sensory, language, cognitive, gross-motor, fine-motor, and social-emotional development;
    Denver II Developmental Screen

    Test design

    The test consists of up to 125 items, divided into four parts:

    • Social/personal: aspects of socialisation inside and outside the home - eg, smiling.
    • Fine motor function: eye/hand co-ordination, and manipulation of small objects - eg, grasping and drawing.
    • Language: production of sounds, and ability to recognise, understand and use language - eg, ability to combine words
    • Gross motor functions: motor control, sitting, walking, jumping, and other movements

    Ages covered by the tests range from 2 months to 71 months.[5] Source:  http://www.patient.co.uk/doctor/denv...screening-test

    Ages and Stages Questionnaire ASQ-3 addresses five developmental areas: communication, gross motor, fine motor, problem solving, and personal-social.  Source:  http://agesandstages.com/what-is-asq/faq/
    Health status and/or sensory (vision, hearing) screening may be conducted separately (at separate times, using different screening methods) from the other types of screening.
    E. A plan for evaluating the effectiveness of the screening program; and
       
       
    F. Using the results to make referrals to appropriate professionals, when needed, and ensuring that the referrals are followed.
    Family Handbook (Excerpt from Section 14)

    Developmental Screening: Developmental Denver II Screenings determine a child’s growth regarding developmental milestones.  It is used to determine if a child may benefit from more in-depth developmental assessments.  Mentor teachers will discuss screening outcomes & possible potential benefits with family members including the purpose, the scoring, and the training process for teacher candidates, and interpretation of the screening for their child.  Family members may have access to screening information or copies of the developmental screening instrument at any time.

     

    If a child may have developmental delay, the mentor teacher will set up a 1:1, confidential meeting with family members to discuss the possibility of an additional developmental screen, such as the Ages and Stages screen or a selected checklist or work sampling may be used as a second tool in determining the benefit for early intervention.  The meeting will also include the documentation and explanation of the concern from the first screen, suggested next steps, and information about further community resources in the early intervention B-3 services system or the school district system if the child is older than 3 years.  We encourage to families whose children may benefit from early intervention to seek services and advocate for their children.  As a teaching team, we will advocate for families who are seeking services, too.

    Mentor Teacher Handbook (Excerpt from pg. 58-59)

    Developmental Screening:  Developmental Denver Screenings purpose is to determine a child’s growth regarding developmental milestones.  It is used to determine if a child may benefit from more in-depth developmental assessments.  Mentor teachers will discuss screening outcomes & possible potential benefits with family members including the purpose, the scoring, and the training process for teacher candidates, and interpretation of the screening for their child. 

     

    If a developmental delay is suspected, the mentor teacher will discuss the possibility of an additional developmental screen, such as the Ages and Stages screen or a selected checklist or work sampling may be used as a second tool in determining the benefit for early intervention.  Communicating the possibility of further screening is something that needs to be communicated to families in a sensitive, support and confidential manner which also includes documentation and explanation of the concern from the first screen, suggested next steps, and information about resources for further assessment in the early intervention B-3 services system or the school district system if the child is older than 3 years.

    A published instrument is required to meet criterion 4.C.01, which refers to development screening.  Therefore, a screening tool cannot be staff developed, although it may be administered by staff.  The program staff may also work with consultants or agencies to arrange for screening rather than conduct it themselves. 

    Programs may provide evidence of system-wide developmental screening - i.e. a screening plan and blank instrucments used.  Evidence includes screening results collected by agencies orther than the program (e.g. physician's office, health department, school systems).

    By definition, a development screening is a standardized procedure or test used to quickly appraise a large number of children to find out which ones need further evaluation and must meet professional standards for standardization, reliability, and validity.

    When a program uses a publised curriculum/assessment system for screening purposes the program must include a detailed written explanation as to how they are implementing the curriculum/assessment system as a screening.

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